Monographie

En ligne (disponible) - Monographie
65+ in the United States : 2010 / WEST, Loraine A. ; [et al].
Washington : United States, Census Bureau, 2014, [192] p.

http://www.census.gov/content/dam/Census/library/public... (24-07-2014)
Collection : Current Population Reports
Format de fichier : Adobe Acrobat PDF
Droits d'auteur : La reproduction de ce document à des fins non commerciales est autorisée à condition que la source soit dûment mentionnée.

Lieux géographiques
: États-Unis

Mots-clés principaux
:
Vieillissement démographique
Statistiques démographiques
Situation sanitaire

Mots-clés secondaires : Maladie chronique ; Espérance de vie ; Condition sociale ; Milieu social

Résumé :

The report points out some critical health-related issues:
Rates of smoking and excessive alcohol consumption have declined among those 65 and older, but the percentage of overweight and obese people has increased. Between 2003-2006, 72 percent of older men and 67 percent of older women were overweight or obese. Obesity is associated in increased rates of diabetes, arthritis, and impaired mobility, and in some cases with higher death rates.
Research based on NIA's Health and Retirement Study suggests that the prevalence of chronic diseases, such as high blood pressure, heart disease, chronic lung disease, and diabetes, increased among older people between 1998 and 2008. For example, in 2008, 41 percent of the older population had three or more chronic conditions, 51 percent had one or two, and only 8 percent had no chronic conditions.
The cost of long-term care varies by care setting. The average cost of a private room in a nursing home was $229 per day or $83,585 per year in 2010. Less than one-fifth of older people have the personal financial resources to live in a nursing home for more than three years and almost two-thirds cannot afford even one year. Medicare provides coverage in a skilled nursing facility to older and disabled patients for short time periods following hospitalization. Medicaid covers long-term care in certified facilities for qualifying low-income seniors. In 2006, Medicaid paid for 43 percent of long-term care.
"Most of the long-term care provided to older people today comes from unpaid family members and friends," noted Suzman. "Baby boomers had far fewer children than their parents. Combined with higher divorce rates and disrupted family structures, this will result in fewer family members to provide long-term care in the future. This will become more serious as people live longer with conditions such as cancer, heart disease and Alzheimer's."

Other areas covered in the report include economic characteristics, geographic distribution, social and other characteristics.

Illustrations : graph.
Langue : Anglais
Doc n° : 31218
NumRec : 6756503
31218.pdf
31218.pdf
 

       

  Copier Permanent URL de cette page Ajouter cette page

     

disponible
Réserver
Pour réserver ce document, vous devez d'abord vous connecter


Aller vers :   IUGM    Fondation IUGM   Centre de recherche IUGM